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ECOLOGICAL DREAMING
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I'M INTERESTED IN HELPING PEOPLE EXPERIENCE THE WORLD IN NEW WAYS. 

My upcoming book Hacking Experience: New Tools from Cognitive Science for Artists is in preparation for Punctum Books (NYC). It's a book that translates cognitive science into tools that radically enhance the way artists tell stories. I design experiences in the physical world as a form of myth making by harnessing attention and spatial rhetoric. I'm also principal designer for Geologic Cognition Society, a post-disciplinary research-driven design group. I've lived in ChicagoEngland, Nigeria, Papua New Guinea, and Hawai'i (among other places), Hawaii made the most sense to me. At the moment, I live in Ohio and I'm exploring the Great Lakes region for a few projects I'm wrapping up.

Find me on Twitter @RyanDewey, or get in touch here.

MOVING & PLACING A SALT ROCK ONLY TO WATCH IT DECAY

For my recent exhibition UNDERNEATH IS BEFORE I was able to obtain a massive salt rock to place outside the gallery. Here are some photos from the move and the subsequent weathering the block has undergone since placement.

I moved a 300 million year old salt block onto this plinth at SPACES gallery in Cleveland, in essence partially replicating a work completed by Brinsley Tyrrell in 1996. Pictured is Brandon Barski (right) of Great Escapes Landscaping who helped me transport and place the block.

I moved a 300 million year old salt block onto this plinth at SPACES gallery in Cleveland, in essence partially replicating a work completed by Brinsley Tyrrell in 1996. Pictured is Brandon Barski (right) of Great Escapes Landscaping who helped me transport and place the block.

I spent the day with Brinsley Tyrrell at his studio where he showed me a number of salt blocks that he acquired from the Lake Erie mines.

I spent the day with Brinsley Tyrrell at his studio where he showed me a number of salt blocks that he acquired from the Lake Erie mines.

Salt crystals find a substrate to grow on, it's a vein of pyroclastic ash.

Salt crystals find a substrate to grow on, it's a vein of pyroclastic ash.

Moving the block proved incredibly difficult and we worked into the night.

Moving the block proved incredibly difficult and we worked into the night.

The next morning I worked with Brandon to place the block on the plinth, we discovered that the block was actually in two pieces and we were able to roll them separately onto the plinth.

The next morning I worked with Brandon to place the block on the plinth, we discovered that the block was actually in two pieces and we were able to roll them separately onto the plinth.

After a few weeks of rain and snow the vein of pyroclastic ash is softening and turning to mud.

After a few weeks of rain and snow the vein of pyroclastic ash is softening and turning to mud.

The vein of pyroclastic ash separates one layer of salt from another.

The vein of pyroclastic ash separates one layer of salt from another.

As the weather dissolves the vein of pyroclastic ash the salt block calves a slab of salt onto the ground below - note the absence of snow around the fragment, this is an ancient ocean that has been reactivated to melt the surrounding snow pack. I gathered some of this slush around the salt and measured the salinity: 5.6%.

As the weather dissolves the vein of pyroclastic ash the salt block calves a slab of salt onto the ground below - note the absence of snow around the fragment, this is an ancient ocean that has been reactivated to melt the surrounding snow pack. I gathered some of this slush around the salt and measured the salinity: 5.6%.