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ECOLOGICAL DREAMING
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I'M INTERESTED IN HELPING PEOPLE EXPERIENCE THE WORLD IN NEW WAYS. 

My upcoming book Hacking Experience: New Tools from Cognitive Science for Artists is in preparation for Punctum Books (NYC). It's a book that translates cognitive science into tools that radically enhance the way artists tell stories. I design experiences in the physical world as a form of myth making by harnessing attention and spatial rhetoric. I'm also principal designer for Geologic Cognition Society, a post-disciplinary research-driven design group. I've lived in ChicagoEngland, Nigeria, Papua New Guinea, and Hawai'i (among other places), Hawaii made the most sense to me. At the moment, I live in Ohio and I'm exploring the Great Lakes region for a few projects I'm wrapping up.

Find me on Twitter @RyanDewey, or get in touch here.

Geologic Cognition Society, exploring the anthropocene with art & science

I founded Geologic Cognition Society as a work group of artists and scientists so that we could collaborate, build installations, and conduct research on how to compress large-scale geologic issues into human-scale experiences and stories. We've done a few projects, and now we're in the process of formalizing a lot of our work, but we have several projects in various stages of completion at the moment. If you haven't seen our snazzy one-page site, I encourage you to read it now: GeoCog.org (maybe even say hi through the web form).

Here's a picture of us taking physical and sonic measurements in a fracture cave (Ryan Dewey, Ron Jost, Andrew Boji Wang, image taken by Jonathan Hooper). We were measuring the propagation of sound waves on the fossilized ancient seabed ripples where the dolomite layer meets the upper layer of limestone.

Here's a picture of us taking physical and sonic measurements in a fracture cave (Ryan Dewey, Ron Jost, Andrew Boji Wang, image taken by Jonathan Hooper). We were measuring the propagation of sound waves on the fossilized ancient seabed ripples where the dolomite layer meets the upper layer of limestone.